Moderna says its COVID vaccine is safe and effective in adolescents aged 12 to 17

U.S – Leading pharmaceutical manufacturer Moderna says that clinical trials have proved its COVID shot 100 percent effective and safe for use among teenagers.

The company seeks to acquire FDA approval before summer to administer the vaccine. It would be the second Covid-19 vaccine available for the age group if it is authorized for use, in addition to the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine.

Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel said that the firm is glad the mRNA-1273 was highly effective at preventing covid amongst adolescents, “we remain committed to doing our part to help end the COVID-19 pandemic”, he continued.

The Moderna vaccine has been reported to have 92 percent effectiveness in adults 14 days after administration. The vaccine has continued to be effective even against new variants of the virus.

Vaccinating children is an important factor toward arresting the spread of COVID-19. Experts have expressed concerns that until children are vaccinated, the country is less likely to develop herd immunity.

However, the concept of herd immunity continues to become farfetched given the rise of new variants from time to time.

Children make up 20 percent of the total U.S population, according to government data. Vaccinating children will boost efforts being made to resume in person learning, extracurricular activities and other in person activities.

According to the company, 3,700 adolescents were involved in the trials. There were no cases of COVID-19 among the vaccinated groups after two shots.

There were no adverse effects reported save for pain on the site of injection. After the second dose, most of the subjects complained of headache, fatigue, muscle pain and chills.

Measures have been put in place to monitor the cove for a duration of 12 months after their second shot to assess long-term protection and safety of the Moderna vaccine.

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